Travel in Germany

Buy a car in Germany
Autotrader: Convenient Automobile Buying For People In Africa  - Used Cars From Germany - Auto Export To Africa - Shipping rates - auto transport

Car Export to Africa: Mercedes Benz 190, Nissan Patrol , Toyota Hiace, RAV4, Land Cruiser, Corolla, Camry, C-class, van, minibus, Diesel. Ghana, Nigeria, Angola

FineRide02

I love my fine ride!

MB300DVRklein
C180TVR102
RAV4gruenVL03

contact me by email:
info@car-exporter.de

Sprinter210VL
CruiserVLNOF
300DVR

LHD only !
You should know that all used cars from Germany have left hand steering. You won’t find any RHD vehicles on the German market.

HeinzKlein
Travel in Germany

Email me:
info@car-exporter.de
 

I always look to buy Toyota, Nissan and Mercedes minibuses, SUV’s and 190D

Accident, Fire, Robbery: Emergency Numbers in Germany

Emergency numbers in Germany are:

  • · 110 (police) and
  • · 112 (fire brigade and ambulance).
  • Both numbers are toll-free and can be dialled from any public telephone all over the country as well as from any mobile phone.
  • Credit Cards in Germany

    All major credit cards are widely accepted in Germany, but you can’t buy a car with a credit card. Car sellers want cash! There is an extensive network of ATMs all over the country. ATMs usually accept VISA, Mastercard, Maestro and ec-cards.Traveller Cheques are less common, but you can pay with them in several shops and can be cashed by banks, post-offices and all major hotels.

     

    Lost, Not Found: Cancelling Credit Card, Mobile Phone etc.

    There is one central emergency number for support in case of loss of credit card or other means of electronic payment, PIN-codes for electronic banking, mobile phones etc.: 116 116

    Not all operators and providers are already participating, but more and more are joining in. Up-to-date information (in German only) is available from Sperr e.V. http://www.116116.eu

     

    Travelling by Train, Deutsche Bahn

    Railway companies will get you almost anywhere in Germany. Although the railway system has been liberalized and opened to competition in the 1990s, "Deutsche Bahn" (German rail) still is the market leader.

    It operates the superfast ICE-trains, that take travellers from Hamburg up in the north of Germany to Munich in the south in about six hours, or in approximately four hours from Cologne to Berlin. ICE trains can reach a speed of up to 300 km/h (about 190 mph).

    It operates the superfast ICE-trains, that take travellers from Hamburg up in the north of Germany to Munich in the south in about six hours, or in approximately four hours from Cologne to Berlin. ICE trains can reach a speed of up to 300 km/h (about 190 mph).

    Motorist's Dream: Driving Yourself in Germany

    For those who prefer to drive themselves, Germany provides a dense and extensive network of motorways ("Autobahn"), through roads ("Bundesstraße") and regional roads ("Landstraße").

    For motorways, a pioneering distance-based electronic toll system has been introduced for trucks with a permissible total weight of 12 tons or more.

    There is no general speed limit for Germany's motorways, but there is a recommended speed of 130 km/h. On countryroads a maximum speed of 100 km/h (62 mph) must not be exceeded; inner-city traffic allows a speed of 50 km/h (32 mph).

    For temporary stays in Germany, foreign driving licences are accepted. Travellers are requested to produce a German translation of their licence but an international driving licence will be accepted without translation. Citizens of the EU Member States are exempted from this rule.

    There are several car rental companies, which work nationwide.

    Finding your way is made easy by several online tools that can guide you through Germany. The link on the right leads you to a web-tool provided by the German National Tourist Board.